Idaho Powerball Numbers

The Idaho Lottery has paid out $2.2 billion in prizes since 1989, the largest of which was to a Powerball player who won $220 million in 2005. More than $840 million has also been raised to benefit the state’s public schools, colleges and universities. View the Idaho Powerball numbers below.

Saturday, November 16, 2019
4x Rollover
  • 14
  • 22
  • 26
  • 55
  • 63
  • 26
  • 3
Idaho Winners
2,985
All States Total Winners
454,385
ID Jackpot Winners
0
Next Estimated Jackpot
$80 Million

View All State Payouts

Match ID Winners Prize Per Winner ID Prize Fund
5 + PB 0 $70,000,000 No Winners
5 0 $1,000,000 No Winners
4 + PB 0 $50,000 No Winners
4 1 $100 $100
3 + PB 4 $100 $400
3 105 $7 $735
2 + PB 81 $7 $567
1 + PB 581 $4 $2,324
0 + PB 1,438 $4 $5,752
5 (Power Play) 0 $2,000,000 No Winners
4 + PB (Power Play) 0 $150,000 No Winners
4 (Power Play) 2 $300 $600
3 + PB (Power Play) 0 $300 No Winners
3 (Power Play) 19 $21 $399
2 + PB (Power Play) 31 $21 $651
1 + PB (Power Play) 219 $12 $2,628
0 + PB (Power Play) 504 $12 $6,048

Past Results

You can find more Idaho Powerball results below. Select the '+ View Payouts' button to view a full breakdown of the prizes won in each draw.


State Specific Rules

To play Powerball in Idaho, select five main numbers from 1 to 69 and one Powerball between 1 and 26, or opt for a Quick Pick if you would prefer to enter a random line. Add the Power Play for the chance to boost non-jackpot winnings. The following rules are also specific to the Gem State.

  • You must be at least 18 years of age to take part.
  • You can play the same numbers for up to 10 consecutive drawings by marking the relevant box in the Multi-Draw section of your playslip.
  • Ticket sales close at 7:54pm Mountain Time (9:54pm Eastern Time) on draw days, before reopening five minutes later for the next draw.
  • Prizes over $5,000 will be subject to state tax at a rate of 6.925 percent, in addition to the Federal withholding of 24 percent.

You can watch the drawings on the following TV stations, depending on where you are in Idaho.

City Station Affiliate Channel
Boise KTVB NBC 7.2
Lewiston KLEW CBS 3.1
Pocatello/Idaho Falls KPVI NBC 6/6.1, 1006
Twin Falls KTFT NBC 7.2

How to Claim Prizes

To claim a prize of up to $599, just go to any licensed lottery retailer in Idaho or submit a claim by mail. If you win a larger prize, you can still submit your claim by mail or visit the Idaho Lottery headquarters.

If you are mailing your claim, you will need to send in your signed winning ticket, along with a claim form and a copy of your driver’s license or government-issued photo ID. You should also make a photocopy of the claim form and winning ticket and keep them for your records. Submit your claim to the following address:

Idaho Lottery
P.O. Box 8687
Boise, ID 83707

The location of the Idaho Lottery headquarters, where you can claim prizes of $600 or more in person, is as follows:

Idaho Lottery
1199 Shoreline Lane
Suite 100
Boise, ID 83702

Claiming As a Lottery Pool

If you play in a lottery pool, you will all receive checks for your portion of the money, with the required amount of tax withheld from each member. You will all have to fill out individual W-2G forms regarding your tax liability. Each individual must fill out a claim form and state what percentage of the prize they are claiming.

Claim Period

You have 180 days from the date of the draw to claim your Powerball prize, otherwise the money will be transferred to the dividend fund. If you win the jackpot, you can take up to 60 days from the date you come forward to decide whether you want to accept the annuity or the lump sum payment.

Lost and Damaged Tickets

Your Powerball ticket is the only proof that you have played the game so you have no grounds to make a claim if you lose it. You should print your name on the ticket and sign it to prevent anyone else from being able to make a claim. You are also unlikely to be able to claim a prize with a damaged ticket, as it must meet a series of validation requirements to check that it is still intact, legible and has not been altered in any way.

Going Public

You cannot stay anonymous if you win a large Powerball prize in Idaho. Your name, city, county, state of residence and prize amount will be made public, while your photograph may also be used for promotional purposes.

Where Does the Money Go?

The majority of the revenue, 67 percent, is used to pay Powerball prizes, while retailers receive a six percent commission for the tickets they sell. There are a number of smaller costs, including program operations and game support (four percent), administration (two percent) and marketing communications (one percent). The Idaho Lottery’s primary mission is to give back to the people of the state, so 20 percent is set aside for the annual dividend.

Half of the dividend is given to public schools, with funds spread out to different districts to buy new equipment or help with essential maintenance or repairs. The other 50 percent goes to the Permanent Building Fund, which provides financial support for Idaho's colleges and universities.

Idaho Powerball Winners

Brad Duke, from the city of Star in northwest Idaho, set the record for the biggest Powerball win in the state when he claimed $220 million on Memorial Day weekend in May 2005. A regional fitness director, Brad bought his ticket at Jackson’s Food Mart in Boise and didn’t even think about the results until a friend mentioned later that someone in the area had won the jackpot. He asked for his ticket to be checked when he stopped for fuel at Stinker Station and the surveillance footage from the store which later played on the local news showed two female employees jumping up and down in excitement.

Brad retreated to his truck to phone his dad, unsure if he had even paid for his fuel. When he eventually came forward, Brad decided to take the one-time payment of $125 million. He said he wanted to buy a new car, take a trip with friends, buy a new bike and maybe build a house in Boise. However, he added that he would avoid making too many large purchases as he wanted to create a billion-dollar empire to better take care of his family.