Arizona Powerball Numbers

Arizona is one of only several states where you must be 21 years or older to play the lottery, but despite the higher age limit, players in the Grand Canyon State have helped to raise over $3 billion for public initiatives since the lottery was established, ranging from wildlife conservation programs to funding for arts and education. View the latest Arizona Powerball numbers below.

Winning Numbers

Saturday, November 9, 2019
2x Rollover
  • 14
  • 17
  • 35
  • 38
  • 60
  • 25
  • 2
Arizona Winners
10,368
All States Total Winners
420,261
AZ Jackpot Winners
0
Next Estimated Jackpot
$60 Million

View All State Payouts

Match AZ Winners Prize Per Winner AZ Prize Fund
5 + PB 0 $50,000,000 No Winners
5 0 $1,000,000 No Winners
4 + PB 0 $50,000 No Winners
4 6 $100 $600
3 + PB 19 $100 $1,900
3 323 $7 $2,261
2 + PB 306 $7 $2,142
1 + PB 2,277 $4 $9,108
0 + PB 5,609 $4 $22,436
5 (Power Play) 0 $2,000,000 No Winners
4 + PB (Power Play) 0 $100,000 No Winners
4 (Power Play) 1 $200 $200
3 + PB (Power Play) 3 $200 $600
3 (Power Play) 73 $14 $1,022
2 + PB (Power Play) 61 $14 $854
1 + PB (Power Play) 505 $8 $4,040
0 + PB (Power Play) 1,185 $8 $9,480

Past Results

You can find more Arizona Powerball results below. Select the '+ View Payouts' button to view a full breakdown of the prizes won in each draw.


Arizona Powerball Rules

To play Powerball in Arizona, simply pick up a playslip from any licensed lottery retailer and select five main numbers between 1 and 69 and one Powerball between 1 and 26. The following state-specific rules also apply:

  • You must be at least 21 years of age to buy lottery tickets or redeem prizes in Arizona.
  • You can play up to 10 consecutive drawings in advance by marking the relevant Multi Draw box on your playslip.
  • State taxes of five percent will be withheld on all prizes, in addition to federal taxes.
  • The cut-off for ticket sales is 6:59pm MT on the night of each draw, with sales reopening after the winning numbers have been confirmed.

Head to the How to Play page to learn more about how to enter Powerball draws.

How to Claim

Lottery retailers in Arizona are obligated to pay out all prizes up to $100. All you need to do is sign the back of the winning ticket and take it to your nearest retailer to be validated. They may also pay out prizes of up to $599, although they may refuse if they do not have sufficient cash available. In these instances you will need to claim your winnings from another retailer or one of the Arizona Lottery offices below.

Any prizes of $600 or more need to be claimed at the lottery’s offices in Phoenix and Tucson. You will need to complete a winner claim form, obtainable from retailers, and you will need to provide a valid photo identification, such as a driver’s license or government-issued ID. Take these documents to one of the following addresses. Both offices are open 08:00–17:00 MT Monday to Friday, excluding state holidays.

Location Address Telephone
Phoenix 4740 E. University Dr., Phoenix, AZ 85034 (480) 921-4400
Tucson 2900 E. Broadway Blvd., Ste 190, Tucson, AZ 85716 (520) 628-5107

Alternatively, you can claim prizes of $600 or more by mail. Send the signed winning ticket, along with a completed claim form and a copy of a valid photo ID, to: Arizona Lottery, P.O. Box 2913, Phoenix, AZ 85062. You should make a copy of both sides of your winning ticket before mailing it. When claiming a jackpot prize by mail, you may need to complete further paperwork. In this case, you should contact the Arizona Lottery’s Phoenix office for further guidance.

If you win the jackpot, you have 60 days from the date you claim to decide whether you want to take the lump sum or annuity payments. If you do not make your choice known to the Arizona Lottery by the end of this period, you will receive the annuity by default.

Claiming With a Lottery Pool

When claiming a prize as part of a lottery pool, all members must fill out a claim form and decide whether the payments should be made directly to each individual or to one representative. If the money is paid to one member, it is then their responsibility to distribute it to the rest of the group.

All members of the pool must be at least 21 years old, and in the event of a jackpot win, every member needs to take the same payout option of a lump sum or annuity. All relevant documents must be submitted to the Arizona Lottery at the same time.

Claim Period

You have 180 days from the date of the drawing to claim any prizes. You will not be able to claim any prizes after this period, even if you produce a valid winning ticket.

Lost and Damaged Tickets

Lottery tickets are treated as bearer instruments, meaning that whoever is in possession of one can claim prizes with it. In the event that you lose a winning ticket, you will be unable to claim any prizes you have won. To help protect yourself in the event of a ticket’s loss or theft, sign the back of it straight after purchase, and contact the Arizona Lottery as soon as possible to notify them of the loss. They will not pay out prizes on a lost ticket, but they may be able to help you reclaim it. Prizes may not be paid out on tickets that are too damaged to validate.

Going Public

In April 2019, Arizona lawmakers signed legislation allowing players who have won lottery prizes of $100,000 or over to remain anonymous indefinitely. Any prize wins under that amount are a matter of public record.

In the event of failing to qualify for anonymity, your name, likeness and place of residence may be shared with the public, as well as the prize amount. Further personal details, like your address, social security number or profession will not be divulged.

Where Does my Money Go?

Proceeds from the sale of lottery tickets in Arizona are used to fund programs in four different sectors: Arts and Education, Health and Human Services, Economic Development, and Environmental Conservation. Around 24 percent of the lottery’s revenue is transferred to state funds to be allocated to these areas, with the remaining money from ticket sales paid back to players as prizes and used to cover operating costs and expenses. The table below shows how revenue is split:

Area of Spending Percentage of Revenue
Prizes 63.4%
Transfer of State Funds 24.2%
Retailer Commission 6.8%
Operating Expenses 2.9%
Direct Costs 2.7%

Over $3 billion has been raised for public programs in Arizona to date, including a yearly allocation of $10 million to the Heritage Fund Program for the conservation and protection of the state’s wildlife and natural areas. The fund has been able to use the money to reintroduce wildlife that had previously disappeared from Arizona and acquire 18,000 acres of land for public use and wildlife conservation.

Other beneficiaries include Healthy AZ (Health Families), which works to support pregnant women and new families as they embark upon the journey into parenthood. Homeless and transitional services have also received funding to help end homelessness across the state.

AZ Powerball Winners

Matthew Good, who worked as a manager at an electronics company, won half of a $587 million Powerball jackpot in November 2012. Upon releasing the news of the win, the Arizona Lottery declined to identify the winner at his request, but his name was soon made public after a freedom of information request was filed, in line with state law at the time.

In a statement issued through the lottery, Good said: “It is difficult to express just how thankful we are for this wonderful gift. We are extremely grateful and feel fortunate to now have an increased ability to support our charities and causes. Obviously, this has been incredibly overwhelming and we have always cherished our privacy.” He chose to take a lump sum payout of $192 million.

In June 2015, Maria Herrera of Glendale claimed a jackpot of $188 million, and opted for a lump sum payout of $119 million before taxes. Lottery officials revealed that the winner was reluctant to disclose any personal details or speak to the media, and was “very, very quiet.” The winning ticket was bought at a QuickTrip convenience store in Glendale, and it came less than a month before legislation took effect allowing winners to remain anonymous for 90 days. It was the biggest jackpot to be claimed in Arizona since Matthew Good’s win in 2012.